173/365 Black-headed Gull feeding


Whilst down at the coast yesterday I decided to have a short mini project on Black headed Gulls.  I learnt a lot about their feeding behaviour and how to utilise this to gain better photographs.  It was putting the autofocus system of the 5D mk3 to the test and I can honestly say it coped extremely well.  It is certainly a project that I will be continuing. Here is one of the best from the day.  Not perfect but I like the way the water is trickling down from the bird as it rises from the water.

Black-headed Gull, Chroicocephalus ridibundus, Glamorgan, Wales, February, 2013.
Canon 5D mk3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

173/365 Black headed Gull

172/365 Lesser Black-backed Gull


Photographing in local towns and cities is something I tend not to do on a regular basis.  Sometimes though, a particular scene catches your eye and you think, giving the right situations, the possibility for a special image is there.  Most major cities will have their own local colony of Lesser Black backed Gulls.  This is the same for Worcester.  Passing the River that runs parallel to Worcester on several occasions I noticed that at certain times of day some of these gulls would have their daily preening session.  I’d also noticed the reflections of the buildings on the opposite side of the river.  I planned the photography to be done during the best weather conditions to make the most of the situation.  The image below is one of my favourites from the session.  Its definitely a place I will be going again as there are plenty of possibilities to be had here.

Juvenile Lesser Black-backed Gull, Larus fuscus, Worcester, Worcestershire.
Canon 40D with Canon 500mm F/4 L IS lens.

172/365 Lbbgull

060/365 Sooty Gull Larus hemprichii


To complete February’s images off, todays image is of a Sooty Gull displaying.  Watching your subjects can often reveal extra action shots that you wouldn’t normally achieve.  Like most gulls when they call, they do something interesting.  Watching this species of gull over a few days, I noticed that whilst calling they would often throw their heads back.  Most of the time they did this out of camera range, but one morning, I managed to get close enough to this individual preening.   It was just a matter of patience and hoping that it would call when it had finished.  I wasn’t dissapointed. 😉

Sooty Gull, Larus hemprichii, Red Sea, Egypt, April, 2009.
Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens

057/365 White eyed Gull Ichthyaetus leucophthalmus


A very smart looking bird indeed, image 057 shows an adult White-eyed Gull. An endemic species to the Red Sea area, it can be found in small flocks along with the Sooty Gull (here). We usually encountered these birds along the stretch of beach just after sunrise, before all the holiday makers woke up.

White-eyed Gull (Ichthyaetus leucophthalmus), Red Sea, Egypt, April, 2009.
Canon 40d with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS Lens.

053/365 Sooty Gull Larus hemprichii


Another from Egypt, 053 is a Sooty Gull. The Red Sea in Egypt is the best place to see Sooty Gull and White-eyed Gull (Ichthyaetus leucophthalmus) in the Western Palearctic, with the White-eyed Gull being endemic here. It was great to see them in good numbers whilst we were there.

Sooty Gull, Larus hemprichii, Red Sea, Egypt, April, 2009.
Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens. 

 

 

049/365 Arctic Terns


Being a wildlife photographer, I am always striving to capture images of interaction between subjects or to get a behavioural shot of a subject. In image 049, these pair of Arctic Tern are showing both! I was ecstatic when I saw this on my computer screen. I had seen it on the LCD screen on the day and it looked good. I wanted to make sure it was sharp enough for publication before getting really excited, and I wasnt dissapointed.

Arctic Tern, Sterna paradisaea, Northumberland, July, 2011.
Canon 1D mkIV with Canon 500mm f/4.0 L IS lens.