Adobe Lightroom Workshop 3rd July 2015


I am running an Adobe Lightroom Workshop at The Flash Centre on Friday 3rd July 2015. If you are interested in attending please get in touch with me. More information on the course content can be found here: https://ianbutlerphotography.wordpress.com/adobe-lightroom/
£99 per person for up to 8 people.
See image for details of the day.

LightroomTFC

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202/365 Spotted Flycatcher Muscicapa striata


I always enjoy looking through past images… mostly because you can see how much improvement I have made over the years. Sometimes you come across images that stand out from the rest and using up to date processing technique brings them to life… thats exactly what I’ve done with this one. Its of a Spotted Flycatcher taken somewhere in Wales (it was that long ago I can’t remember!). When I looked at the exif data I had quite a shock… taken in July 2004 with a Canon 100-400mm and… wait for it…. a Canon EOS 300D!!

202/365 Spotted Flycatcher

Little Owl Athene noctua


Whilst waiting for bee-eaters to land on a perch in front of the hide, a Little Owl surprised me by landing on it instead. A little squeak from myself got it looking straight down the barrel of my lens, but it soon lost interest when it realised I wasn’t food. Great to see it at short range. 
Little Owl, Athena noctua, Hungary, July, 2013
Canon 5D3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS with 1.4xIII converter. 1/250s at f/5.6 at ISO1250.

For more images check out my facebook page here Ian Butler Photography and like it to receive further updates.

188/365 Little Owl

COMPETITION TIME !!


COMPETITION TIME!
Do you want to win a “Birds of Prey and Owls in Europe” book?!
If yes, follow these three simple steps:
1. Like my Ian Butler Photography page! Follow this link: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ian-Butler-Photography/337924406281107?hc_location=timeline
2. Share this competition!
3. Identify the bird of prey in the photograph and put your answer in the comments!

I will randomly select one of the correct answers and I will be in touch to send you the prize.

Competition ends on the 31st July 2013!

Good luck!

and heres the image:

_Y128127

152/365 Spider


Whilst walking around a woodland this morning trying to photograph butterflies (I’ve used the word ‘trying’ for a reason as it was a very unsuccesful trip!!!) I entered a shadowed area of the woodland where tiny rays of light were filtering through the canopy.  As I walked through, I came across a spider web that was glinting in these rays.  Thinking to myself that would make a nice photograph but thinking the lighting was nowhere near enough good for photography I nearly continued on my journey.  Luckily, I like a challenge and thought that the butterflies were not playing ball so decided to have a go! 
If you can imagine this web was the size of a jam jar lid and the spider was about 5mm long!  (I’d missed the spider at first as it was so small).  This web was moving up and down at about 20mm range and backwards and forwards so I didnt think at all that any of these images would come out sharp.
So to recap…  we have a small web, small spider, moving target and low light…. all great conditions for macro photography! 😉
Anyway, I perservered and I’m glad I did. 
Due to the low light I had to boost the ISO up to 2000 and because I wanted a fairly fast shutter speed I decided to use a large aperture of f/3.5 giving me a resulting shutter speed of 1/200 sec.  Due to the background being so dark, I knew from experience that the camera would expose off this, instead of the 5% of the frame that the spider occupied.  If I had photographed this at 0 compensation the image would have been completely over exposed as the camera would have metered for the background resulting in a very slow shutter speed giving me a glowing bright white spider and web.  Instinct took over and I knew that I had to reduce the exposure compensation by at least -2.  Trial shots resulted in me dialing in – 2 1/3 compensation to get a correct exposure on the spider and web, plunging the background into darkness. 
The ray of light was so small that I actually missed the shot as sorting the camera out and finding the correct settings had left the spider in shadow.  I now had to wait for the next ray of light to come and light the web up.  After a 15 minute wait (and following several rays of light across the woodland floor hoping for it to have the right track  to the web) I finally had what I had seen in the first place with the web being spot lit by a tiny single ray of light.  I’m so glad I waited as for me, this image is probably one of the best I’ve taken. For me, I would probably put it down to luck as it could have gone completely the other way but I’m really glad I stopped to try and achieve what I was seeing.  Regardless of how difficult a situation may be, I think this proves there can always be a happy ending. 😉

This image is better viewed larger so please click on the image.

Spider, Worcestershire, July, 2012.
Canon 5d MK3 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens.
1/200s @ f/3.5, ISO 2000 and -2 1/3 E/V

 

147/365 Large Skipper butterfly


As it was forecast to be dry (at last!) and fairly calm last night, I decided to go out and try and find some butterflies.  Within about 5 minutes I found this Large Skipper on a Self-heal flower.

Large Skipper, Ochlodes sylvanus, Herefordshire, July, 2012.
Canon 5d mk3 with Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens and flash setup.