Lesser Celandine Ranunculus ficaria


Photographers often say that the best photographs are taken close to home and I have to agree with this.
I would really like to describe how I trekked miles in to a remote ancient woodland and fought off three bears for this image but it would be far from the truth as the location was in the garden. The garden is very wildlife friendly and a section of it in the spring is covered by a yellow carpet of Lesser Celandine.  The celandine is from the Ranunculus family which holds around 600 species including the buttercups. I particularly liked this image with the composition and depth of field.

Canon 5D Mk3 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens with angle finder.

Handheld. 1/250s, f/4 at ISO400.

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199/365 Marbled White Melanargia galathea


Photographing butterflies is always better when they are less active. Choosing a cool summer morning was the best to photograph this Marbled White butterfly as it was still roosting on this Plantain seed head. The temperature had dropped below the dew point overnight causing the small droplets of water to form along the antennas of this individual.

Marbled White, Melanargia galathea, Worcestershire, July, 2011.

199/365 Marbled White

195/365 Green veined White Pieris napi


I have a love-hate relationship with my Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens. It produces stunningly sharp images but the focus is soooooo slow!! I’ve yet to try or read reviews of the new version of this lens so hopefully they have rectified this. Here is an image of a Green-veined White butterfly nectaring from a thistle head.

Green veined White, Pieris napi, Warwickshire, June, 2011.
Canon 1DIV with Sigma 150mm f/2.8 lens, 1/1250sec at f/7.1 at ISO400.

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152/365 Spider


Whilst walking around a woodland this morning trying to photograph butterflies (I’ve used the word ‘trying’ for a reason as it was a very unsuccesful trip!!!) I entered a shadowed area of the woodland where tiny rays of light were filtering through the canopy.  As I walked through, I came across a spider web that was glinting in these rays.  Thinking to myself that would make a nice photograph but thinking the lighting was nowhere near enough good for photography I nearly continued on my journey.  Luckily, I like a challenge and thought that the butterflies were not playing ball so decided to have a go! 
If you can imagine this web was the size of a jam jar lid and the spider was about 5mm long!  (I’d missed the spider at first as it was so small).  This web was moving up and down at about 20mm range and backwards and forwards so I didnt think at all that any of these images would come out sharp.
So to recap…  we have a small web, small spider, moving target and low light…. all great conditions for macro photography! 😉
Anyway, I perservered and I’m glad I did. 
Due to the low light I had to boost the ISO up to 2000 and because I wanted a fairly fast shutter speed I decided to use a large aperture of f/3.5 giving me a resulting shutter speed of 1/200 sec.  Due to the background being so dark, I knew from experience that the camera would expose off this, instead of the 5% of the frame that the spider occupied.  If I had photographed this at 0 compensation the image would have been completely over exposed as the camera would have metered for the background resulting in a very slow shutter speed giving me a glowing bright white spider and web.  Instinct took over and I knew that I had to reduce the exposure compensation by at least -2.  Trial shots resulted in me dialing in – 2 1/3 compensation to get a correct exposure on the spider and web, plunging the background into darkness. 
The ray of light was so small that I actually missed the shot as sorting the camera out and finding the correct settings had left the spider in shadow.  I now had to wait for the next ray of light to come and light the web up.  After a 15 minute wait (and following several rays of light across the woodland floor hoping for it to have the right track  to the web) I finally had what I had seen in the first place with the web being spot lit by a tiny single ray of light.  I’m so glad I waited as for me, this image is probably one of the best I’ve taken. For me, I would probably put it down to luck as it could have gone completely the other way but I’m really glad I stopped to try and achieve what I was seeing.  Regardless of how difficult a situation may be, I think this proves there can always be a happy ending. 😉

This image is better viewed larger so please click on the image.

Spider, Worcestershire, July, 2012.
Canon 5d MK3 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens.
1/200s @ f/3.5, ISO 2000 and -2 1/3 E/V

 

104/365 Wood White butterfly Leptidea sinapis


After being involved in a research project for two years studying these little gems, I have to say that these Wood White butterflies have to be one of my favourite insects.  Very similar to the Green-veined White (in my post yesterday)  but the top wing is a lot more rounded  in the Wood White compared to the quite angled edge to the other ‘white’ butterflies.

Wood White, Leptidea sinapis, Herefordshire, June, 2009.
Canon 40D with Canon 100mm f/2.8 macro lens.

103/365 Green-veined White butterfly


Todays image is of a Green-veined White nectaring on a thistle head.

Green-veined White, Pieris napi, Worcestershire, 2011.
Canon 1d mkIV with Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens

Dont forget all of images can be enlarged so please click on the image to view larger.

102/365 Common Darter


Todays image 012 is of a Common Darter.  As their name suggests they ‘dart’ after their prey.  They do this by waiting on an exposed perch, waiting for an insect to fly past, darting out after it and then returning to the same perch to eat it if succesful or waiting for another insect if not.  I’d noticed this particular individual kept returning to this particular perch.  It was just a matter of getting closer and closer until it was where I wanted it in the frame.

Common Darter, Sympetrum striolatum, Worcestershire, 2011.
Canon 1d mkIV with Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens.