Wildlife and Landscape Greeting Cards


I’ve dabbled with handmade greeting cards over the past few years for friends and family but it was about time I started to produce these on a more commercial basis.  Well it’s now happened and the first 10 greeting cards are available to buy directly from myself.  The designs are listed below:

Portraits from left to right:
IBP001 Red Fox
IBP002 Kingfisher
IBP003 Robin
IBP004 Red Kite
IBP005 Red Squirrel
IBP006 Bornean Orangutan

Landscapes from left to right
IBP007 St Michael’s Mount
IBP008 Pink-footed Geese
IBP009 Borneo Sunset
IBP010 Great Malvern Priory

GreetingcardIGreetingcardII

Details:
Cost: £2.00 plus p&p
The front image is sized A5 (half of an A4)
Printed on thick 300gsm card with a soft silk finish and luxury white envelope.
All cards are left blank inside for your own message.
They are really excellent quality and I’m very proud to add them to my product collection. If you would like to order any of these designs either contact me directly or go to my website in the gallery section under Greeting Cards.

Fox Greeting Card

British Birds front cover!


It’s always a great feeling when you see your images in print but even better when they are used as a front cover! The British Birds journal has used my Stonechat image for their May issue.  This is such a great informative journal on all things avian and is a must read for any one with an interest.  For more information on the contents of this issue click here: http://www.britishbirds.co.uk/article/british-birds-may-2015/

Please click on the image to view a larger version.

May-2015-cover1

Lesser Celandine Ranunculus ficaria


Photographers often say that the best photographs are taken close to home and I have to agree with this.
I would really like to describe how I trekked miles in to a remote ancient woodland and fought off three bears for this image but it would be far from the truth as the location was in the garden. The garden is very wildlife friendly and a section of it in the spring is covered by a yellow carpet of Lesser Celandine.  The celandine is from the Ranunculus family which holds around 600 species including the buttercups. I particularly liked this image with the composition and depth of field.

Canon 5D Mk3 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens with angle finder.

Handheld. 1/250s, f/4 at ISO400.

LesserCelendine_IB04157991

Article: How to photograph Black Redstart


I have just finished an article on how I photographed a pair of Black Redstarts in a Hungarian garden in June.  Lots of information and details included for those who are interesting in setting something like this up from start to finish.

The pdf can be downloaded by following this link to my website:

How to photograph Black Redstart

Black Redstart

224/365 Misty Knot Calidris canutus


Definitely a marmite shot for the viewers of my blog.  I wanted to capture the big flocks of Knot during the hide tides at Snettisham RSPB in Norfolk.  Setting the alarm for stupid o’clock in the morning I arrived on site to the sound of hundreds of thousands of Knot on the estuary.  I emphasise sound of Knots as I couldn’t see 20 metres in front of me because of a heavy sea fog that had enveloped the whole of the estuary.   Getting into position I knew the fog would lift eventually but not as soon as I would have liked. As the tide came in all those thousands of Knot, Oystercatcher, Godwits, Dunlin, all those fantastic birds I should have been photographing were pushed off the estuary where they were feeding to roost on the reserve, straight over the top of my head.  The only problem was the fog was still to thick to do anything with them.  After an hour or so, the sun started to burn off the fog and small shapes were starting to appear.  Even though you can’t make out what the birds are (unless you an expert in identifying birds’ silhouettes) I still liked the contrast and mystery of these images as the birds tried to find a place to roost.

Knot, Calidris canutus, Snettisham RSPB, Norfolk, September, 2013.
Canon 5DIII with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

224/365 Knot

208/365 Bee-eater Merops apiaster


New locations always throw up difficulties and this new Bee-eater colony was no exception. A few sessions here provided some nice results and I can’t want to try out some new ideas next year. Here’s a pair in the last rays of the sun.
European Bee-eater, Merops apiaster, Hungary, 2013.

208/365 Bee-eater

207/365 BBC Wildlife Magazine published image


It is great to see one of my images almost full page in the November issue of the BBC Wildlife Magazine! Check it out on page 58.
The image is of a group of Sanderling on a very windswept beach on South Uist, Outer Hebrides taken in September last year.
The current issue is on sale now from all good newsagents. More information on the current issue can be found here:http://www.discoverwildlife.com/issue/november-2013
Here’s the image:

207/365 Sanderling