143/365 Fulmar


I’ve been processing a lot of images today! The latest ones I have looked at are these Fulmar images from Bempton Cliffs so I thought I would share a few.
Fulmars are great birds to watch as they cruise along the cliff tops on stiff wings but can move at a considerable speed so I’ve deleted quite a few of just heads and tails.  They are a member of the tubenose family of seabirds which refers to the tube like structure which cover their nostrils (seen in this image as the dark area above the yellow bit of the bill).  Other ‘tubenoses’ consist of shearwaters and petrels. 

Fulmar, Fulmarus glacialis, Bempton Cliffs RSPB, East Yorkshire, June, 2012.
Canon 1D MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens

142/365 Tree Sparrow


As mentioned in the previous post, Tree Sparrows breed under the tiles in the roof of the visitor centre at Bempton Cliffs RSPB.  This image shows a male with a beak full of spiders and other insects ready to feed those wide open gapes of the hungry chicks.

Tree Sparrow, Passer montanus, Bempton Cliffs RSPB, East Yorkshire, June, 2012.
Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

141/365 Displaying Tree Sparrow


Around the visitor centre at Bempton Cliffs RSPB is a great place to see Tree Sparrows.  They nest under the tiles in the roof and are often seen squabbling around the bird feeders at the back of the centre.  Here, a male Tree Sparrow is asserting his dominance!

Tree Sparrow, Passer montanus, Bempton Cliffs RSPB, East Yorkshire, June, 2012.
Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

140/365 Kittiwake


An image of a Kittiwake taken from Bempton Cliffs RSPB.  I particularly like this image because of the position of the Kittiwake and because its calling.  The added feature is the white bokeh effect in the background that is caused by the auks (razorbills, guillemots and puffins) that are out of focus on the sea.

Kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, Bempton Cliffs RSPB, East Yorkshire, June, 2012.
Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

 

139/365 Cruising Gannet


Another image at Bempton Cliffs RSPB back from the first week of June.  Where possible, I try to capture the essence of the scene whilst I am photographing birds and I’m sure you will agree that this Gannet looks its best against the oceanscape and the cloud formations.

Gannet, Sula bassana, Bempton Cliffs RSPB, East Yorkshire. June, 2012.
Canon 1D MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4.0 L IS lens.

Digital presentation / talks page added


Since I became a freelance photographer,  I have been visiting RSPB, Wildlife trusts, nature groups and camera clubs presenting my work in the form of digital slideshows.
I have just updated a new page for this blog purely for details on my talks. 
If you know of any group within the UK (or abroad) who is after any speakers for your clubs then please ask them to get in touch. They can get in touch with me directly here: http://www.ianbutlerphotography.co.uk/contact.php
Details of the talks I offer can be found on my talks page at the right hand side of the header above or if you want to go straight to the link please click here:
https://ianbutlerphotography.wordpress.com/talks/

Looking forward to hearing from you. 😉

 

136/365 Goshawk Accipter gentilis


Todays image is another photograph from Hungary and this time is a juvenile female Goshawk.  I knew I had the possibility of photographing this species at the drinking pool but the actual probability was fairly slim. 
These birds are massive, they are extremely powerful and to be in the presence of one was simply awe inspiring.  When it landed I think I stopped breathing, I stopped blinking, I just froze to the spot hoping that it wasn’t alerted to my presence and fly away.  Luckily for me it sat there drinking and bathing for around 45 minutes!
The funniest incident happened whilst I was there.  A hare came bounding along the back of the drinking pool (probably hoping for something to drink) only to come to a very fast halt eye-balling its main predator in the eye at around 2 metres! They stared at each other for about 5 minutes with the Goshawk being ever slightly bemused that the hare would come so close. Luckily for the hare this bird was a juvenile… I think if it was an adult Goshawk it would have been a very different story and I would be showing pictures of a Goshawk with hare as the main course! 😉
A fantastic experience and one I’m never likely to have again.

Goshawk, Accipter gentilis, Pusztaszer, Hungary, June, 2012.
Canon 1d MKIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.