New Square Greeting Cards


New greeting cards just sent off for printing including 10 new designs! Will be available to buy from next week. Watch this space!
All greeting cards will be square and 148mm in size.

New designs include (from top left to bottom right):

Yacht at Sunrise
European Bee-eaters
Poppies
Great Malvern Priory in snow
Mute Swan with cygnets
Poppies and Cornflowers
Puffin
Robin in snow
Spoonbill
Sunflower
Tawny Owl
Whooper Swan in snow

Please contact me if you are interested.

New Greeting Cards

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Wildlife and Landscape Greeting Cards


I’ve dabbled with handmade greeting cards over the past few years for friends and family but it was about time I started to produce these on a more commercial basis.  Well it’s now happened and the first 10 greeting cards are available to buy directly from myself.  The designs are listed below:

Portraits from left to right:
IBP001 Red Fox
IBP002 Kingfisher
IBP003 Robin
IBP004 Red Kite
IBP005 Red Squirrel
IBP006 Bornean Orangutan

Landscapes from left to right
IBP007 St Michael’s Mount
IBP008 Pink-footed Geese
IBP009 Borneo Sunset
IBP010 Great Malvern Priory

GreetingcardIGreetingcardII

Details:
Cost: £2.00 plus p&p
The front image is sized A5 (half of an A4)
Printed on thick 300gsm card with a soft silk finish and luxury white envelope.
All cards are left blank inside for your own message.
They are really excellent quality and I’m very proud to add them to my product collection. If you would like to order any of these designs either contact me directly or go to my website in the gallery section under Greeting Cards.

Fox Greeting Card

230/365 Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus


One from the weekend at a falconry centre where a green background just didn’t cut it.  I decided to use a grey barn door behind the Peregrine Falcon as it acted as a very effective stormy cloud backdrop.

Canon 5D Mk3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS and Canon 1.4x III teleconverter.

230 365 Peregrine Falcon

224/365 Misty Knot Calidris canutus


Definitely a marmite shot for the viewers of my blog.  I wanted to capture the big flocks of Knot during the hide tides at Snettisham RSPB in Norfolk.  Setting the alarm for stupid o’clock in the morning I arrived on site to the sound of hundreds of thousands of Knot on the estuary.  I emphasise sound of Knots as I couldn’t see 20 metres in front of me because of a heavy sea fog that had enveloped the whole of the estuary.   Getting into position I knew the fog would lift eventually but not as soon as I would have liked. As the tide came in all those thousands of Knot, Oystercatcher, Godwits, Dunlin, all those fantastic birds I should have been photographing were pushed off the estuary where they were feeding to roost on the reserve, straight over the top of my head.  The only problem was the fog was still to thick to do anything with them.  After an hour or so, the sun started to burn off the fog and small shapes were starting to appear.  Even though you can’t make out what the birds are (unless you an expert in identifying birds’ silhouettes) I still liked the contrast and mystery of these images as the birds tried to find a place to roost.

Knot, Calidris canutus, Snettisham RSPB, Norfolk, September, 2013.
Canon 5DIII with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

224/365 Knot

154/365 Grey Phalarope b/w


A revisited image of a Grey Phalarope that I have converter to black and white.

Grey Phalarope, Phalaropus falicarius, September, 2011.
Canon 1D mkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

152/365 Spider


Whilst walking around a woodland this morning trying to photograph butterflies (I’ve used the word ‘trying’ for a reason as it was a very unsuccesful trip!!!) I entered a shadowed area of the woodland where tiny rays of light were filtering through the canopy.  As I walked through, I came across a spider web that was glinting in these rays.  Thinking to myself that would make a nice photograph but thinking the lighting was nowhere near enough good for photography I nearly continued on my journey.  Luckily, I like a challenge and thought that the butterflies were not playing ball so decided to have a go! 
If you can imagine this web was the size of a jam jar lid and the spider was about 5mm long!  (I’d missed the spider at first as it was so small).  This web was moving up and down at about 20mm range and backwards and forwards so I didnt think at all that any of these images would come out sharp.
So to recap…  we have a small web, small spider, moving target and low light…. all great conditions for macro photography! 😉
Anyway, I perservered and I’m glad I did. 
Due to the low light I had to boost the ISO up to 2000 and because I wanted a fairly fast shutter speed I decided to use a large aperture of f/3.5 giving me a resulting shutter speed of 1/200 sec.  Due to the background being so dark, I knew from experience that the camera would expose off this, instead of the 5% of the frame that the spider occupied.  If I had photographed this at 0 compensation the image would have been completely over exposed as the camera would have metered for the background resulting in a very slow shutter speed giving me a glowing bright white spider and web.  Instinct took over and I knew that I had to reduce the exposure compensation by at least -2.  Trial shots resulted in me dialing in – 2 1/3 compensation to get a correct exposure on the spider and web, plunging the background into darkness. 
The ray of light was so small that I actually missed the shot as sorting the camera out and finding the correct settings had left the spider in shadow.  I now had to wait for the next ray of light to come and light the web up.  After a 15 minute wait (and following several rays of light across the woodland floor hoping for it to have the right track  to the web) I finally had what I had seen in the first place with the web being spot lit by a tiny single ray of light.  I’m so glad I waited as for me, this image is probably one of the best I’ve taken. For me, I would probably put it down to luck as it could have gone completely the other way but I’m really glad I stopped to try and achieve what I was seeing.  Regardless of how difficult a situation may be, I think this proves there can always be a happy ending. 😉

This image is better viewed larger so please click on the image.

Spider, Worcestershire, July, 2012.
Canon 5d MK3 and Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro lens.
1/200s @ f/3.5, ISO 2000 and -2 1/3 E/V