116/365 Coot on nest displayed on Canon stand


This image was taken a few years ago but I was absolutely delighted to see it printed large as the backdrop to the Canon stand at the London Wild Bird Watch event at the London Wetland Centre over the weekend.  The image itself was around 4m x 2.5m so was fantastic to see it that large. A great pleasure and honour having my image displayed like this! Thank you Canon!!

and the actual image on the stand (taken with my IPhone!)

and a very happy me!

111/365 Reed Warbler


One of the rarer occasions when a Reed Warbler is actually on full view instead of being buried inside a deep reed bed.

Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, Gailey Reservoir, Staffordshire, May, 2006.

Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens and Canon 1.4x II teleconverter.

 

025/365


Like the Bittern in post 016/365 here, this Reed Warbler lives in dense reedbeds.  Image 025 shows this species in its habitat rather than a portrait of the bird itself.

Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, Gailey Reservoir, Staffordshire, May, 2006.

Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4.0 L IS lens and Canon 1.4x II teleconverter.

016-365


Image 016 (if you can see it!) is of a Bittern taken today.  Bitterns have got to be one of the worlds best camouflage experts and they will test the most patient of photographers.  I knew this individual was within 30ft of me and still it remained unseen for an hour and half. The only tell tale give away of its position was the cracking of reeds underneath its giant feet as it moved inch by inch through the reeds… and even then the reeds werent moving.  Fortunately, after three hours of waiting overall, this bird finally gave itself up and showed well for about 10mins. I particularly like this image, as it shows the dense habitat they reside in and also how well they blend into their surroundings using their cryptic plumage.

As you can imagine, manual focus was used here as even the most advanced autofocus system would have struggled to get focus lock with the matt of reed stems in front of the bird. 

Bittern, Botaurus stellaris, Gloucestershire, January, 2012.
Canon 1D Mk4 with Canon 500mm f/4.0 lens.