226/365 Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus


It’s great when everything comes together for an image.  This Green Sandpiper had spent most of the time feeding against a muddy bank offering limited photo opportunities.  I was lucky that the light was really nice when it walked into this clear area of water and started to preen itself.

Green Sandpiper, Tringa ochropus, Hungary, June, 2014.
Canon 5D3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

226/365 GreenSand

161/365 Misty Tufted Duck


Following on from the previous post and not wanting to miss the first appearance of the Osprey I moved around to the opposite side of the reservoir.  The mist was still apparent but no where as thick as it was.  I noticed a female Tufted Duck bathing in the water and knew that she would flap her wings after she had finished.  Setting up, it was just a matter of waiting.  She was fairly distance so opted for a more minimalistic approach to the image.

Tufted Duck, Aythya fuligula, Upton Warren, Worcestershire, September, 2012.
Canon 5dMK3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens and 1.4x II converter.

160/365 Misty Mallard


Getting up early sometimes gives you the edge over images taken later in the day.  Wanting to photograph the osprey in one of the previous posts (here), I was on site about 20mins before sunrise.  Looking at the weather forecast the night before and expecting a clear blue sky (which it was), what I didn’t realise was that the reservoir was going to have a very thick layer of mist hanging over the top of it.  Within an hour this mist was gone, being burnt off by the heat of the sun.  Knowing that the best pictures would be taken through the mist towards the sun I positioned myself in the best spot and waited for the sun to come up over the horizon.   To say it was fantastic was an understatement.  I would have been more than happy just to watch this scene unfold in front of me with mysterious shapes and shadows dancing around in the mist being backlit by the rising sun.  Im just glad there was a fair bit of activity with gulls and ducks making fairly regular appearances and coming within camera range for a decent photograph.

Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Upton Warren, Worcestershire, September, 2012.
Canon 5d MK3 with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

 

117/365 Mute Swan with cygnets


With all of the new ducklings around reservoirs and lakes at the moment I thought I would show this image of a Mute Swan with her cygnets taken in the late afternoon light.

Mute Swan, Cygnus olor, Staffordshire, June, 2010.
Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS.

 

115/365 Coot offering


On another part of the London Wetland Centre, this pair of Coots were rearing 4 chicks. The adult male was always bringing little bits of food back for the sitting female and the chicks. Occasionally it would bring back extra strips of reed as nesting material.  It would very gently hand it to the female and this is the tender moment of this offering.

Coot, Fulica atra, London, April, 2012.
Canon 1D mkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

114/365 Coot


Coots are a very common and familiar species for most people and are often overlooked as photographic subjects because of this.  I saw this bird preening  from a distance so approached with the idea of capturing the reflection aswell. After preening most birds will wing stretch or flap or do something interesting so its just a matter of time and waiting patiently.

Coot, Fulica atra, London, April, 2012.
Canon 1D mkIV with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.

 

112/365 Great Crested Grebe


Image 112 was taken when the sun had just dipped below the horizon giving this very peaceful reflected light on the waters surface.  The great crested grebe was an added bonus as it paused momentarily in the reeds.

Great crested Grebe, Podiceps cristatus, Gailey Reservoir, Staffordshire.
Canon 40D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens.