038/365 Asian Palm Swift Cypsiurus balasiensis


Number 038 is of an Asian Palm Swift.  Distributed over most of Borneo, I found these whizzing around the hotel grounds catching insects.  They are called Palm swifts due to their nesting behaviour.  They will build their nest on the inside of a closed palm leaf, keeping them sheltered from the rain. 

Asian Palm Swift, Cypsiurus balasiensis, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.
Canon 1d Mk4 with Canon 70-200mm f/2.8  L IS lens.

 

037/365 White-breasted Woodswallow, Artamus leucorynchus


Following on the Bornean theme, todays image, #037 is of a White-breasted Woodswallow.  Quite a chunky looking bird, when perched and in flight, these birds were seen most days on our trip.  On this particular morning, I had set out to photograph a tern that had frequented a small bay opposite our hotel.  On returning back to the hotel grounds, this bird was displaying this pose, flicking its wings on regular occasions.  Whether it was displaying to the handful of Woodswallows in the sky, or whether it was telling me off, or whether it was doing this as an aggresive pose to alert others of a potential danger, such as a snake, I don’t know. It made for a nice series of images though.

White-breasted Woodswallow, Artamus leucorynchus, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.
Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 500mm f/4.0 L IS lens.

To see more of my images of this bird please click this link here.

 

036/365 Long-tailed Macaque, Macaca fascicularis


If you are not too bored of the Borneo theme, I’d like to continue with image 036, which is of a Long-tailed Macaque.  These were drinking from a river as we edged closer in a low sided boat allowing me to get this low viewpoint of this one preening.  I really like the way the light is highlighting the eyes in this.  With Borneo, the light can be very dark but most of the time it is very dappled as it squeezes through the gaps in the dense vegetation.  Wait until the subject gets in the correct position and then press the shutter. Sounds easy doesnt it! 😉

Long-tailed Macaque, Macaca fascicularis, Sandakan, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.
Canon 1d mkIV with Canon 500mm f/4.0 L IS lens.

035/365 An Orangutan called Reg!


Image 035 is of a very cheeky chappy called ‘Reg’ who is an orphaned Orangutan in the Shangri La’s rehabilitation centre. His mother was killed as a result of the destruction of rainforest to make way for the huge areas of sugar cane plantations. Sugar cane, which has no biodiversity value at all for the wildlife, directly effects the environment in many ways. Endemic species such as Orangutan, Proboscis monkey, Pygmy Elephant are threatened to extinction because of it. Hopefully, Reg will be able to be rehomed very soon in a rainforest that is safe from destruction (which unforunately isn’t a lot anymore!)

Bornean Orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia.

Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 17-40mm f/4.0 L lens.

034/365 Aerial view of Pulau Gaya


Image 034 is an aerial view of Pulau Gaya, the largest island in the Tunku Abdul Rahman marine national park, situated just off the northwest coast of Borneo, opposite Kota Kinabalu. The villages that you can see around the edges are the stilt villages where illegal immigrants from the Phillipines have set up residence. We were warned not to go there by the locals as it is a very dangerous place with a high crime rate.

Pulau Gaya, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.
Canon 1d mk4 with Canon 17-40mm f/4.0 L lens.

033/365 Mt Kinabalu, Borneo


Todays image, number 033, is of a very early morning sunrise over Mt Kinabalu.  This mountain is the highest in Borneo at 4095m (13,435ft) and offers the locals a welcome cool retreat from the hot and humid  lower altitudes. 

Mt Kinabalu, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.
Canon 1d mk4 with Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS lens. 

026/365


After watching a programme about the plight of the Slow Loris in Java on BBC2 last night, image 026 is of a male Bornean Slow Loris I was lucky enough to see and photograph in a rehabilitation centre in Borneo.  Although protected by law, Slow Loris are cruelly being taken from the wild to be sold as pets in markets in the exotic pet trade.  The ‘cuteness’ of these animals is unfortunately linked to how popular they are as pets and therefore growing supply and demand of these creatures is playing a role with their rapid demise in the wild.  The Natural World programme with Dr Anna Nekaris can be seen again on BBC iPlayer here.
Unlike the Slow Loris in Java this fortunate individual will be released back into the wild.

More images of this species can be found on my agency website here: ALAMY

Bornean Slow loris, Nycticebus menagensis, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia, April, 2010.

Canon 1d MkIV with Canon 17-40mm f/4.0 lens.